superbowl anti-drug ad


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Posted by PK on 02/05/02 - 18:38:51
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Message Body

Paul2All>>>

I'VE NEVER BEEN ONE TO FEAR
BUT THERE IS A TIME FOR VALOR AND A TIME FOR VALIANT DISCRETION...

THINK OF ASHCROFT COVERING UP THE BOOBS ON THE STATUE OF JUSTICE
AND WHAT A DORK HE IS
DORKS CAN BE DANGEROUS
KNOW THE WATERS YOU ARE SAILING IN

CAREFUL NOW

PK
SF



Subject:
        Super Bowl Ad Out Of Bounds
   Date:
        Tue, 5 Feb 2002 13:36:35 -0500 (EST)
  From:
        TakeAction
    To:
        X@aol.com


RE: THIS ALERT

ACTFORCHANGE ACTIVISM UPDATE:  February 5, 2002

You
are receiving this newsletter because you have previously taken action on
ActForChange in support of progressive values.

-URGENT ACTION
ALERT-

SUPER BOWL AD OUT OF BOUNDS
HREF="http://act.actforchange.com/cgi-bin7/flo?y=aFIp0BBVgn0ChP0TUi0Ac">workingforchange.com/activism/action.cfm?itemid=12761

If
you watched the Super Bowl, you probably saw two dramatic ads that link
illegal drug use and terrorism -- including the terrorist attacks on
September 11. Super Bowl Sunday has become as famous for the slick
commercials run between plays as for the actual game played on the field, and
by any measure these particular spots sent a powerful message. Unfortunately,
that message is misguided, and the millions being spent to promote it are a
sad waste.

Don't get us wrong: Addictive drugs like cocaine and heroin
are destroying lives and families in America every day. It is also true that
drug sales generate profits for overseas cartels and terrorists often sell
drugs to finance violence. However, it makes no sense for the government to
buy the most expensive airtime there is to air spots that seem designed
mainly to link the popular War on Terrorism with the unpopular War on
Drugs.


Only a third of federal anti-drug money is earmarked for prevention and
treatment programs -- even though waiting lists for treatment programs are so
long as to be cruel. Yet out of these limited funds, the White House spent
$3.2 million to air two 30-second commercials.

The ads were created
under the auspices of President Bush's drug czar as part of a $10 million
campaign. In the first ad, a litany of a terrorist's expenses concludes with
a question: "Where do terrorists get their money? If you buy drugs, some of
it may come from you." The second ad splices images of teenagers claiming
drugs are "just fun" with other teens taking the blame for atrocities
committed in other countries. "I helped murder families in Colombia," says
one kid, "I helped the bomber get a fake passport," claims
another.

While such shocking statements may hit viewers in the gut,
they will do little, if anything, to end either drug abuse or drug-related
violence. By almost any measure, the United States' War on Drugs continues to
be an abject failure, and the reasons are pretty simple: The profits from the
illegal sale of drugs, like cocaine and heroin, are so large that drug
cartels can overwhelm the billions of dollars spent on seizing drugs and
counter-narcotics operations overseas.


The White House's Super Bowl ads represent the continuation of a failed
policy that does not serve our kids, fight terrorists or help to liberate
those living under the scourge of governments corrupted by drug money.
Instead, they represent a missed opportunity to channel millions of dollars
into drug prevention and treatment programs that work.

E-mail
President Bush to express outrage that millions of dollars were spent on
misguided Super Bowl ads when important treatment and prevention programs are
underfunded.
HREF="http://act.actforchange.com/cgi-bin7/flo?y=aFIp0BBVgn0ChP0TUi0Ac">workingforchange.com/activism/action.cfm?itemid=12761


Melissa
Simpson  
Manager
ActForChange.com



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